Where Transit Is On The Ballot

Twenty-seven transit-related ballot initiatives are up for a vote this November — the largest being Los Angeles’ bid for $120 billion over 40 years for transit, transportation and road improvements, paid for with a half-cent sales tax increase. (Note: This list does not include bond referenda.)

Circles sized by the amount of money requested in the proposal. Most involve sales tax increases.

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Arizona

Flagstaff

Funded by: Sales tax (0.295%)

The revenue generated by the sales tax renewal would continue to fund the Mountain line bus services.

California

Contra Costa County

$2.3 billion over 30 years

Funded by: Sales tax (half-cent)

If passed the half-cent tax increase would help fund projects to improve freeways, increase transit operations, fill in pot holes and ease traffic congestion overall.

Los Angeles

$120.0 billion over 40 years

Funded by: Sales tax (half-cent)

The revenue generated from the sales tax would go to expanding and improving light rail and subway lines, transportation and road improvements.

Placer County

Funded by: Sales tax (half-cent)

The revenue from the increased sales tax would help fund road and rail improvements, transit functions and bicyclist and pedestrian infrastructure.

Sacramento County

$3.6 billion over 30 years

Funded by: Sales tax (half-cent)

The funds generated from the increased sales tax would primarily be used to fund road projects and projects improving regional transit "including expanded bus service and light rail to the airport."

San Diego

$7.5 billion over 40 years

Funded by: Sales tax (half-cent)

The revenue generated from the sales tax would help fund a long-term plan of highway improvements, public transportation, bicyclist and pedestrian projects, rail projects and a sky-way gondola system.

San Francisco, Alameda and Contra Costa counties

$3.5 billion over 40 years

Funded by: Increase in property tax bills ($35-$55)

The revenue generated from the increased property tax would help fund improvements in the rapid transit system.

San Luis Obispo County

$0.225 billion over 9 years

Funded by: Sales tax (half-cent)

The revenue from the increased sales tax would be used to fund transportation projects, public transit and infrastructure surrounding bicyclists and pedestrians.

Santa Clara County

$3.0 billion over 30 years

Funded by: Sales tax (half-cent)

The revenue generated from the sales tax would go to funding transportation projects including an expansion of the rapid transit system.

Santa Cruz

$0.5 billion over 30 years

Funded by: Sales tax (half-cent)

The revenue from the increased sales tax will fund transportation improvements in the county, including transit for seniors and disabled people, and analysis of a rail system as a transit option.

Stanislaus County

$0.48 billion

Funded by: Sales tax (half-cent)

The revenue generated from the increased sales tax would go to funding for rail projects, transit, special transportation and improvements for bicyclists and pedestrians.

Ventura County

$3.3 billion

Funded by: Sales tax (half-cent)

Half of the revenue generated from the sales tax would be used to fund regional freeway projects, improvement projects for rail and bus services, transportation technology management, mitigating environmental impacts, and improving pathways used by pedestrians and bicyclists.

Georgia

Atlanta

$2.5 billion over 40 years

Funded by: Sales tax (half-cent)

The revenue generated from the sales tax would rapid transit expansion.

Indiana

Marion County

Funded by: Income tax (0.250%)

The revenue generated by the income tax would help fund expansions of the bus rapid transit system.

Michigan

Eaton County

Funded by: Property tax (.25-mill)

The revenue generated from the increased property tax would be used by the Eaton County Transportation Authority for public transportation projects.

Wayne, Oakland, Macomb and Washtenaw counties

$2.9 billion over 20 years

Funded by: Property tax (1.2 mill)

The revenue generated from the increased property tax would fund a bus rapid transit system and a commuter rail between Detroit and Ann Arbor.

Missouri

Kansas City

Funded by: Sales tax (.375 cent)

The revenue generated from the sales tax would help fund a light rail system.

North Carolina

Greensboro

$0.028 billion

Funded by: Bond

A $28 million portion of the $126 million bond measure would be used to fund transportation projects including public transportation, work on sidewalks and intersections, and improvements for bicyclists.

Wake County

$2.3 billion over 10 years

Funded by: Sales tax (half-cent)

The revenue generated from the sales tax would go to regional transit plans that include expanding bus services and projects for commuter trains between Raleigh, Research Triangle Park and Durham.

Ohio

Columbus and Franklin County

$6.2 billion over 10 years

Funded by: Sales tax (0.250%)

The revenue generated from the renewal of the the sales tax would fund transit authority projects.

Lorain County

$0.0495 billion over 5 years

Funded by: Sales tax (0.25 %)

Half of the revenue generated by the .25 percent sales tax would go to transit.

Stark County

Funded by: Sales tax (0.25 %)

The revenue generated from the sales tax renewal would help fund ongoing operations and creating long-range plans for the region.

South Carolina

Charleston

$1.89 billion over 25 years

Funded by: Sales tax (half-cent)

The revenue generated by the sales tax would be used for public transportation including the Charleston's first bus rapid transit line and upgrades to the system in place now, road and greenbelt projects.

Virginia

Virginia Beach

The ballot in Virginia Beach, VA puts voters with the question "Should the City of Virginia Beach spend local funds to extend Light Rail from Norfolk to Town Center in Virginia Beach?" This ballot measure comes four years after voters adopted an ordiance to help finance The Tide light rail line.

Washington

Kitsap County

$0.0242 billion

Funded by: Sales tax (0.300%)

The revenue generated from the sales tax increase would help partially fund a fast commuter ferry.

Seattle

$54.0 billion over 25 years

Funded by: A sales tax increase, a property tax increase and an increase in motor vehicle excise taxes (~$169)

The revenue generated from the sales tax, property tax and motor vehicle taxes would fund continued work on the city's mass transit system.

Spokane

Funded by: Sales tax (0.300%)

The revenue generated from the sales tax would fund transit projects.